My Sofia Vergara Vanity Fair video just launched. 

Sofia’s resemblance to Sophia Loren inspired the video’s heightened cinematic style. The video moves between black-and-white and color to evoke both classic and modern style, the iconic and the here and now. 

The track in the video is ”Eclisse Twist” by Mina. Antonioni used the song in the 1962 film L’eclisse with Monica Vitti and Alain Delon. In Italy, Mina was known as the Queen of Screamers, and the Tiger of Cremona. There is so much drama and desire in the raw power of her voice. Perfect soundtrack for Sofia. dg

5 notes, September 7, 2013

Me and Peter Bogdonavich…

Me and Peter Bogdonavich…

1 note, February 2, 2013

When Natalie Wood tells James Dean in Rebel without a Cause that life is crushing in on her, and Dean responds, “life can be beautiful,” it kills me every time. It’s the greatest hustle. To confess how fucked up the world is with so much love of life. dg 

When Natalie Wood tells James Dean in Rebel without a Cause that life is crushing in on her, and Dean responds, “life can be beautiful,” it kills me every time. It’s the greatest hustle. To confess how fucked up the world is with so much love of life. dg 

Reblogged from davidshayne, 210 notes, February 1, 2013

There’s the story of an american soldier sitting on a toilet in Vietnam, his rifle on the floor. Vietcong walks in. The American pulls up his trousers first, and then goes for his rifle, but by the time he reaches it, its too late, he’s already dead. Because the most terrifying thing of all in this world isn’t death, it’s looking like a horse’s ass, in perpetuity. And yet this is the job of an actor. Every time she gets on a stage, in front of a camera, when she walks into an audition her job is to make a fool of herself, to admit vulnerability, strip herself bare and reveal herself in a room full of strangers and cynics. Like a junkie, she’s addicted to love. She’s willing to kill for it, die for it. I want what she wants but she wants it more, so I buy a ticket and a popcorn to see her suffer, a vision of my own flesh and blood on the screen, and sure enough I turn her fuck ups into my own salvation. It’s just that simple - if she can make me believe that she’s telling the truth, that her words, laughter and tears are real, then maybe, if I’m willing to go far as she goes, she might just save me, for however a brief moment, from my own fears. Can’t think of a single profession that requires more guts, more compassion, more wisdom. -dg
ultrabrilliant:


Raging Bull / Grzegorz Domaradzki

There’s the story of an american soldier sitting on a toilet in Vietnam, his rifle on the floor. Vietcong walks in. The American pulls up his trousers first, and then goes for his rifle, but by the time he reaches it, its too late, he’s already dead. Because the most terrifying thing of all in this world isn’t death, it’s looking like a horse’s ass, in perpetuity. And yet this is the job of an actor. Every time she gets on a stage, in front of a camera, when she walks into an audition her job is to make a fool of herself, to admit vulnerability, strip herself bare and reveal herself in a room full of strangers and cynics. Like a junkie, she’s addicted to love. She’s willing to kill for it, die for it. I want what she wants but she wants it more, so I buy a ticket and a popcorn to see her suffer, a vision of my own flesh and blood on the screen, and sure enough I turn her fuck ups into my own salvation. It’s just that simple - if she can make me believe that she’s telling the truth, that her words, laughter and tears are real, then maybe, if I’m willing to go far as she goes, she might just save me, for however a brief moment, from my own fears. Can’t think of a single profession that requires more guts, more compassion, more wisdom. -dg

ultrabrilliant:

Raging Bull / Grzegorz Domaradzki

Reblogged from ultrabrilliant-deactivated20130, 5,054 notes, January 15, 2013

I don`t try to sympathize with my characters, I just try to empathize with them. to try to understand. if I sympathised with the characters I would make idealized, romantic characters out of them, which I don`t do. I don`t idealize them, I just do normal characters, not very sympathetic, but just the way they are. isabelle huppert
via pablogt

I don`t try to sympathize with my characters, I just try to empathize with them. to try to understand. if I sympathised with the characters I would make idealized, romantic characters out of them, which I don`t do. I don`t idealize them, I just do normal characters, not very sympathetic, but just the way they are. isabelle huppert

via pablogt

1 note, January 13, 2013

In The Passenger, a gunrunner goes on about the beauty of the desert. Jack Nicholson’s character confides that he is not interested in landscapes, that he’s more interested in people. The gunrunner replies, “But there are people in the desert.” The final image of the film is a shot of, lo and behold, a beautiful landscape. There is a house in the landscape. In this house, a love affair has just ended, and a man has been killed. dg
(via boy meets girl)

In The Passenger, a gunrunner goes on about the beauty of the desert. Jack Nicholson’s character confides that he is not interested in landscapes, that he’s more interested in people. The gunrunner replies, “But there are people in the desert.” The final image of the film is a shot of, lo and behold, a beautiful landscape. There is a house in the landscape. In this house, a love affair has just ended, and a man has been killed. dg

(via boy meets girl)

3 notes, January 4, 2013

"To me style is just the outside of content, and content the inside of style, like the outside and the inside of the human body—both go together, they can’t be separated." - Jean-luc Godard The French New Wave changed my life. The first time I watched the movies I was twenty one years old. They articulated my desires in ways I didn’t know how to at the time. They spoke to me directly more than any other films I had ever seen. My life doesn’t have a plot. I’ve never shot anybody. I don’t know any spies. I’m not a superhero. The movies were messy, rude, hungry for the world, simple. A man and a woman misfiring, misunderstanding each other, being lost by life, trying to get laid, falling in love - falling out of love, flipping off cops, talking about everything and nothing, the sense of play, the humor, the invention, the freedom and raw beauty, life always bursting at the seems. They were about women written by men with a real interest in exploring a woman’s internal life. Yes they were beautiful and breathtaking but they were also individual. Neither damsel in distress nor femme fatale, they were the searchers, finally, the engine of the picture.
dg

"To me style is just the outside of content, and content the inside of style, like the outside and the inside of the human body—both go together, they can’t be separated." - Jean-luc Godard 

The French New Wave changed my life. The first time I watched the movies I was twenty one years old. They articulated my desires in ways I didn’t know how to at the time. They spoke to me directly more than any other films I had ever seen. My life doesn’t have a plot. I’ve never shot anybody. I don’t know any spies. I’m not a superhero. The movies were messy, rude, hungry for the world, simple. A man and a woman misfiring, misunderstanding each other, being lost by life, trying to get laid, falling in love - falling out of love, flipping off cops, talking about everything and nothing, the sense of play, the humor, the invention, the freedom and raw beauty, life always bursting at the seems. 

They were about women written by men with a real interest in exploring a woman’s internal life. Yes they were beautiful and breathtaking but they were also individual. Neither damsel in distress nor femme fatale, they were the searchers, finally, the engine of the picture.

dg

4 notes, January 3, 2013

On Aug 7, 2011, at 7:16 PM, David Gutnik <david.gutnik@gmail.com> wrote:
>  what I love about westerns is this idea that the value of a man isn’t defined by money and power but how he wears his hat, how he rides his horse, where he draws a line in the sand. is it okay to shoot a man in the back? would you give up a friend for loot? the myth of the west is a moral proposition- are you good, bad or ugly? 
should we grab some food?
David GutnikSent from my phone212.767.9361
via picturinghistory

On Aug 7, 2011, at 7:16 PM, David Gutnik <david.gutnik@gmail.com> wrote:

 what I love about westerns is this idea that the value of a man isn’t defined by money and power but how he wears his hat, how he rides his horse, where he draws a line in the sand. is it okay to shoot a man in the back? would you give up a friend for loot? the myth of the west is a moral proposition- are you good, bad or ugly? 

should we grab some food?

David Gutnik
Sent from my phone
212.767.9361

via picturinghistory

4 notes, January 2, 2013

fear thrusts me into narrative by instigating a physical reaction, it means i&#8217;m sitting at the edge of my seat, it means my palms are sweating, it means my breathing is faster than usual. dg (via toirock)

fear thrusts me into narrative by instigating a physical reaction, it means i’m sitting at the edge of my seat, it means my palms are sweating, it means my breathing is faster than usual. dg (via toirock)

6 notes, January 1, 2013

I’m interested in how people fool themselves, not how they fool others. John Cassavetes

I’m interested in how people fool themselves, not how they fool others. John Cassavetes

15 notes, December 31, 2012